Category Archives: Innovation

From curiosity to compliance

It occurred to me the other day that before toddlers start school they are endlessly playful, curious, their hands into all sorts of things and a ceaseless list of ‘why’ questions. Good parenting involves interacting with such children in a … Continue reading

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Dyslexology: more in common with astrology than with forensic anthropology?

Two weeks ago I attended a lecture on ‘the real world of forensic anthropology’ by Prof Sue Black at the Royal Society of Medicine in London. It was truly inspiring. Prof Black is a leading forensic anthropologist and director of … Continue reading

Posted in Change agent, Cognition, Crime, Dyslexia, Dyslexic, Innovation, anthropology, dyslexologist, dyslexology, forensic, scientific | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

From psychology as a discipline to psychology as a profession

When psychology changed from being an academic discipline to a profession, it incurred many of the negative attributes of commercial organizations; the principal one being a shift in focus from subject expertise, silo thinking and regulatory rituals. The general assumption … Continue reading

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TEDx Salford IV: Festival of the Mind: A handedness meta-perspective

All of last Sunday’s TEDx Salford Festival of the Mind sessions (http://www.tedxsalford.com/) were thoroughly thought provoking. However, for those interested in the link between minds and hands there is another, greater-than-the sum-of the-parts, meta-perspective worth commenting on. Up to the … Continue reading

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Wilshaw’s focus on teachers and teaching rather than learners and learning is misplaced

Sir Michael Wilshaw has launched an online at-a-glance report card for each school, which he wants governors to use to hold head teachers to account. And in order to incentivize them he wants govenors to be paid. So having ‘blamed’ teachers, … Continue reading

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BPS condemns expert’s action-research practice.

Faigman argues that as a general matter the various types of expert testimony courts see can be divided roughly into five categories. In summary: In the first category are experts who propose to testify to a general or specific scientific … Continue reading

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The NHS isn’t the only organisation to impose gagging orders: the BPS does so too

The NHS isn’t the only organization to impose gagging orders on its staff. The BPS has effectively done so on at least one of its members since 2006. For what can only be described as self-serving reasons the British Psychological … Continue reading

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Is the description ‘reflecting, theorising and modelling practitioner’ gobbledegook? The British Psychological Society says “Yes”.

Is the attribution ‘reflecting, theorising and modelling practitioner’ gobbleydegook? The British Psychological Society (BPS) believes it is. Since these attributes, used separately, describe how the BPS itself operates the question arises as to why it should regard the concatenation to … Continue reading

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What do the global financial crisis, Lance Armstrong, Jimmy Savile and the British Psychological Society have in common?

What have the following in common? The global financial crisis; Lance Armstrong; MPs’ expenses, the press phone hacking and the Jimmy Savile scandals; the list is almost endless. The, perhaps, non-obvious answer is they are all instances of systemic failure within institutions … Continue reading

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Learning: a cause or a consequence of being able to do?

‘Learning’ is an epiphenomenon: it is a descriptive label we assign to those changes in thinking, feeling or doing we believe are the result of experience. The antithesis of ‘learning’ is ‘instinct’. Whenever we say behaviour is instinctive we are … Continue reading

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